• File Transfer Protocol (FTP)

    FTP is a protocol for transferring files over TCP/IP networks such as the Internet.

    To transfer files, you need to connect to an FTP server with some FTP client software.

    FTP can be used to transfer very large files, especially files that are too large to be sent via email. However, the need for a server to exchange files with someone else makes this less practical than email.

    FTP is also commonly used to upload web pages and web applications to web sites. Most web servers also feature an FTP server.

    Some commonly use FTP clients are:

    • Windows: FileZilla
    • Mac: CyberDuck, Transmit
    • Unix: ftp command
  • Ethernet

    Frame-based computer networking technology used in local area networks (LANs). Ethernet defines wiring and signaling for the physical layer, and frame formats and protocols for the media access control (MAC)/data link layer of the OSI model. Ethernet is mostly standardized as IEEE 802.3.

    It has become the most widespread LAN technology since the 1990s.

  • WEP

    Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a security protocol specified in the IEEE 802.11 standard to provide the same level of security as the one of a wired LAN.

    WEP provides security by encrypting data sent wirelessly so that it is protected as it is transmitted from one end point to another.

    WEP is not regarded as very secure in the industry. 

  • TIFF

    The Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) is a non compressed bitmap image format, typically produced by scanners.

    TIFF images typically include tags defining the characteristics of the image that is included in the file.

  • Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)

    Network protocol used for automatic configuration of IP computers/devices. A DHCP server provides configuration parameters specific to the DHCP client host requesting, generally, information required by the client host to participate on an IP network. DHCP also provides a mechanism for allocation of IP addresses to client hosts.

  • Bounce Rate

    The bounce rate is the percentage of visitors who leave a web site after viewing a single page.

    This is widely regarded as a bad thing because it may mean that visitors did not find what they were looking for and "bounced" away to another site. They left almost immediately.

    However, this is a broken metric in many cases. For example if you were looking for opening times of a retailer in your city and you found that info right on the homepage of the retailer, you will technically leave the site after a single page view. However it does not mean you did not find what you were looking for.

    Furthermore you may have visited some competing sites in a row, "bouncing" from on e to the next, still finding the exact information (closing times) on each of them in a single page view each.

  • Grayscale

    Shades of gray that represent light and dark portions of an image.

    When color images are converted to grayscale; colors are represented by various shades of gray depending on their brightness.

  • Internet Service Provider (ISP)

    An Internet Service Provider is a company that lets you access the Internet from your home or office by using a DSL modem, a cable modem or any other device (including sattelite links, etc.).

    They are a gateway between the connection that goes into your home/office and the rest of the Internet.

  • HyperText Markup Language (HTML)

    HTML is the language used to create web pages such as the one you are currently looking at.

    HTML is a standard normalized by the W3C.

  • Dual Inline Memory Module (DIMM)

    A small circuit board that holds memory.