• Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP)

    A network protocol used by a network client to obtain its IP address automatically. This is usually done during the bootstrap process of computers or operating systems running on them. The BOOTP servers assign the IP address from a pool of addresses to each client. BOOTP enables 'diskless workstation' computers as well as other networked devices (printers...) to obtain an IP address prior to loading any advanced operating system.

  • Dreamweaver

    Adobe Dreamweaver is a popular HTML editor used to create websites.

  • Lightweight Directory Acess Protocol (LDAP)

    Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) is an networking protocol for querying and modifying directory services running over TCP/IP.

    Is is often use to verify a login/username against a central directory to allow/reject login and then maybe obtain more detailed information on the user (firstname, lastname, etc.)

  • Fuser Unit

    The part of a laser printer that melts the toner onto the print media. It consists of a hot roller and a back-up roller. After toner is transferred onto the paper, the fuser unit applies heat and pressure to ensure that the toner stays on the paper permanently.

    This is why paper is warm when it comes out of a laser printer.

  • Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)

    Network protocol used for automatic configuration of IP computers/devices. A DHCP server provides configuration parameters specific to the DHCP client host requesting, generally, information required by the client host to participate on an IP network. DHCP also provides a mechanism for allocation of IP addresses to client hosts.

  • Duty Cycle

    Duty cycle is the page quantity which does not affect printer performance for a month. Generally the printer has the lifespan limitation such as pages per year. The lifespan means the average capacity of print-outs, usually within the warranty period. For example, if the duty cycle is 48,000 pages per month assuming 20 working days, a printer limits to 2,400 pages a day.

  • Domain Name

    A domain name looks like some-name.com, another-name.org or even yet_another.ca for example.

    Those names are registered centrally for each "Top Level Domain" (TLD) such as .com , .org or .de ( "ca" being teh country code for Canada for example ).

    Once a domain name is registered it can be used to locate servers on the internet by using the Domain Name System in order to route e-mail or access web sites.

  • IEEE

    The Institution of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) is an non-profit organisation involved in advance development of all technologies related to electricity.

  • eXtensible Markup Language (XML)

    XML stands for eXtensible Markup Language.

    It is a way of organizing text and/or contents with tags. Tags look like this:

    <sometag>some content</sometag>

    Of course, although possible, this is not designed to be read by humans. It is designed to be processed by machines. Typically one program generates an XML document and another one computes it to some further extent.

    And XML document very much looks like an HTML document, except that the tags are different.

    There are actually many different dialects of XML, each for a different purpose. Each of these dialects has its own tags. And even more tags can be added. Hence the "eXtensible" in the name.

    There is an XML dialect for writing web pages. It is called XHTML. It is basically the same thing as HTML except for minor syntaxic differences. For example in HYML you would write <BR> whereas in XML you would write <br />.

    Other XML dialects include RSS and Atom.

  • Dual Inline Memory Module (DIMM)

    A small circuit board that holds memory.