• Duty Cycle

    Duty cycle is the page quantity which does not affect printer performance for a month. Generally the printer has the lifespan limitation such as pages per year. The lifespan means the average capacity of print-outs, usually within the warranty period. For example, if the duty cycle is 48,000 pages per month assuming 20 working days, a printer limits to 2,400 pages a day.

  • Grayscale

    Shades of gray that represent light and dark portions of an image.

    When color images are converted to grayscale; colors are represented by various shades of gray depending on their brightness.

  • WPS

    Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS) is a standard for setting up a wireless home network.

    If your wireless access point/router supports WPS, you can configure the wireless network connections easily without requiring a computer. For example, all you may have to do is press a button on the devices to register them on the network.

  • Modem

    A modulator-demodulator is a device used to transmit digital data over an analog channel. It modulates/demodulates a carrier signal in order to encode digital information onto it.

    A modem is typically used to transmit computer data over POTS phone lines.

  • Automatic Document Feeder (ADF)

    An Automatic Document Feeder (ADF) is a mechanism that will automatically feed an original sheet of paper so that a printer can scan some amount of the paper at once.

  • Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP)

    A network protocol used by a network client to obtain its IP address automatically. This is usually done during the bootstrap process of computers or operating systems running on them. The BOOTP servers assign the IP address from a pool of addresses to each client. BOOTP enables 'diskless workstation' computers as well as other networked devices (printers...) to obtain an IP address prior to loading any advanced operating system.

  • eXtensible Markup Language (XML)

    XML stands for eXtensible Markup Language.

    It is a way of organizing text and/or contents with tags. Tags look like this:

    <sometag>some content</sometag>

    Of course, although possible, this is not designed to be read by humans. It is designed to be processed by machines. Typically one program generates an XML document and another one computes it to some further extent.

    And XML document very much looks like an HTML document, except that the tags are different.

    There are actually many different dialects of XML, each for a different purpose. Each of these dialects has its own tags. And even more tags can be added. Hence the "eXtensible" in the name.

    There is an XML dialect for writing web pages. It is called XHTML. It is basically the same thing as HTML except for minor syntaxic differences. For example in HYML you would write <BR> whereas in XML you would write <br />.

    Other XML dialects include RSS and Atom.

  • WEP

    Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a security protocol specified in the IEEE 802.11 standard to provide the same level of security as the one of a wired LAN.

    WEP provides security by encrypting data sent wirelessly so that it is protected as it is transmitted from one end point to another.

    WEP is not regarded as very secure in the industry. 

  • Subnet Mask

    The subnet mask is used in conjunction with the network address to determine which part of the address is the network address and which part is the host address.

    A subnet mask may look like 255.255.255.0 which means the first 3 bytes are part of the network and the last byte is the address of the host on the subnet.

    Another way to write the same network mask as above is /24 which means the 24 first bits (8 bits * 3 bytes) are part of the network.

  • Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)

    Network protocol used for automatic configuration of IP computers/devices. A DHCP server provides configuration parameters specific to the DHCP client host requesting, generally, information required by the client host to participate on an IP network. DHCP also provides a mechanism for allocation of IP addresses to client hosts.