• Domain Name System (DNS)

    DNS is a system that stores information associated with domain names in a distributed database on networks such as the Internet.

    For example, when you type in a domain name like, for example, mozilla.org, you computer will automatically query the Domain Name System to find the actual IP address of the server you are trying to reach, for instance: 63.245.209.11.

    You can see that query in more detail by opening a command window and typing in:
    nslookup mozilla.org

  • Fuser Unit

    The part of a laser printer that melts the toner onto the print media. It consists of a hot roller and a back-up roller. After toner is transferred onto the paper, the fuser unit applies heat and pressure to ensure that the toner stays on the paper permanently.

    This is why paper is warm when it comes out of a laser printer.

  • DLNA

    The Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA) is a standard that allows devices on a home network to share information with each other.

    It is typically used to store media files (photos, music, videos...) on a central server and allow devices like connected TVs or music palyers to access these media files directly through the network.

  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)

    International non-profit, professional organization for the advancement of technology related to electricity.

  • Dual Inline Memory Module (DIMM)

    A small circuit board that holds memory.

  • WPA-PSK

    WPA-PSK (WPA Pre-Shared Key) is special mode of WPA for small business or home users.

    A shared key, or password, is configured in the wireless access point (WAP) and any wireless laptop or desktop devices. WPA-PSK generates a unique key for each session between a wireless client and the associated WAP for more advanced security.

  • Coverage

    Term used for a toner usage measurement on laser printing. For example, 5% coverage means that an A4 sided paper has about 5% image or text on it. So, if the paper or original has complicated images or lots of text on it, the coverage will be higher and at the same time, a
    toner usage will be as much as the coverage.

  • BIT Depth

    The Bit depth describes the number of bits used to represent the color of a single pixel in a bitmapped image. Higher color depth gives a broader range of distinct colors. As the number of bits increases, the number of possible colors becomes impractically large for a color map.

    1-bit color is commonly called as monochrome or black & white.

  • File Transfer Protocol (FTP)

    FTP is a protocol for transferring files over TCP/IP networks such as the Internet.

    To transfer files, you need to connect to an FTP server with some FTP client software.

    FTP can be used to transfer very large files, especially files that are too large to be sent via email. However, the need for a server to exchange files with someone else makes this less practical than email.

    FTP is also commonly used to upload web pages and web applications to web sites. Most web servers also feature an FTP server.

    Some commonly use FTP clients are:

    • Windows: FileZilla
    • Mac: CyberDuck, Transmit
    • Unix: ftp command
  • iTunes

    iTunes™ is a software application developed by Apple. It is available for Mac OS and Windows and can be downloaded freely from apple.com.

    iTunes' original purpose was to allows you to manage your digital music library (mp3, aac, etc.), listen to music on your computer and synchronize your music with your iPod.

    iTunes evolved into a media manager not just handling music/"tunes" but also Movies, TV Shows, Podcasts and more.

    iTunes is required to access the iTunes store which lets you purchase music, videos and othe rmedia but also applications for the iPhone, as well as ringtones.

    More info: http://www.apple.com/itunes/download/