Networks

  • Filezilla

    Filezilla

    FileZilla is a well known FTP client for Microsoft Windows.

    It is known for its reliability.

    Download here.

  • Dreamweaver

    Adobe Dreamweaver is a popular HTML editor used to create websites.

  • HyperText Markup Language (HTML)

    HTML is the language used to create web pages such as the one you are currently looking at.

    HTML is a standard normalized by the W3C.

  • Internet Service Provider (ISP)

    An Internet Service Provider is a company that lets you access the Internet from your home or office by using a DSL modem, a cable modem or any other device (including sattelite links, etc.).

    They are a gateway between the connection that goes into your home/office and the rest of the Internet.

  • DLNA

    The Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA) is a standard that allows devices on a home network to share information with each other.

    It is typically used to store media files (photos, music, videos...) on a central server and allow devices like connected TVs or music palyers to access these media files directly through the network.

  • Modem

    A modulator-demodulator is a device used to transmit digital data over an analog channel. It modulates/demodulates a carrier signal in order to encode digital information onto it.

    A modem is typically used to transmit computer data over POTS phone lines.

  • WPS

    Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS) is a standard for setting up a wireless home network.

    If your wireless access point/router supports WPS, you can configure the wireless network connections easily without requiring a computer. For example, all you may have to do is press a button on the devices to register them on the network.

  • WPA-PSK

    WPA-PSK (WPA Pre-Shared Key) is special mode of WPA for small business or home users.

    A shared key, or password, is configured in the wireless access point (WAP) and any wireless laptop or desktop devices. WPA-PSK generates a unique key for each session between a wireless client and the associated WAP for more advanced security.

  • Subnet Mask

    The subnet mask is used in conjunction with the network address to determine which part of the address is the network address and which part is the host address.

    A subnet mask may look like 255.255.255.0 which means the first 3 bytes are part of the network and the last byte is the address of the host on the subnet.

    Another way to write the same network mask as above is /24 which means the 24 first bits (8 bits * 3 bytes) are part of the network.

  • Domain Name

    A domain name looks like some-name.com, another-name.org or even yet_another.ca for example.

    Those names are registered centrally for each "Top Level Domain" (TLD) such as .com , .org or .de ( "ca" being teh country code for Canada for example ).

    Once a domain name is registered it can be used to locate servers on the internet by using the Domain Name System in order to route e-mail or access web sites.

  • Lightweight Directory Acess Protocol (LDAP)

    Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) is an networking protocol for querying and modifying directory services running over TCP/IP.

    Is is often use to verify a login/username against a central directory to allow/reject login and then maybe obtain more detailed information on the user (firstname, lastname, etc.)

  • Domain Name System (DNS)

    DNS is a system that stores information associated with domain names in a distributed database on networks such as the Internet.

    For example, when you type in a domain name like, for example, mozilla.org, you computer will automatically query the Domain Name System to find the actual IP address of the server you are trying to reach, for instance: 63.245.209.11.

    You can see that query in more detail by opening a command window and typing in:
    nslookup mozilla.org

  • Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)

    Network protocol used for automatic configuration of IP computers/devices. A DHCP server provides configuration parameters specific to the DHCP client host requesting, generally, information required by the client host to participate on an IP network. DHCP also provides a mechanism for allocation of IP addresses to client hosts.

  • Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP)

    A network protocol used by a network client to obtain its IP address automatically. This is usually done during the bootstrap process of computers or operating systems running on them. The BOOTP servers assign the IP address from a pool of addresses to each client. BOOTP enables 'diskless workstation' computers as well as other networked devices (printers...) to obtain an IP address prior to loading any advanced operating system.

  • Ethernet

    Frame-based computer networking technology used in local area networks (LANs). Ethernet defines wiring and signaling for the physical layer, and frame formats and protocols for the media access control (MAC)/data link layer of the OSI model. Ethernet is mostly standardized as IEEE 802.3.

    It has become the most widespread LAN technology since the 1990s.

  • EtherTalk

    A suite of protocols developed by Apple for computer networking. It was included in the original Macintosh (1984) and is now deprecated by Apple in favor of TCP/IP networking.

  • Intranet

    An Intranet is a network using the same protocols of the public Internet but on a private scale, within an organization.

    For example a company may have an intranet for sharing informations between employees. That information would not be accessible outside of the company.

  • Fuser Unit

    The part of a laser printer that melts the toner onto the print media. It consists of a hot roller and a back-up roller. After toner is transferred onto the paper, the fuser unit applies heat and pressure to ensure that the toner stays on the paper permanently.

    This is why paper is warm when it comes out of a laser printer.

  • File Transfer Protocol (FTP)

    FTP is a protocol for transferring files over TCP/IP networks such as the Internet.

    To transfer files, you need to connect to an FTP server with some FTP client software.

    FTP can be used to transfer very large files, especially files that are too large to be sent via email. However, the need for a server to exchange files with someone else makes this less practical than email.

    FTP is also commonly used to upload web pages and web applications to web sites. Most web servers also feature an FTP server.

    Some commonly use FTP clients are:

    • Windows: FileZilla
    • Mac: CyberDuck, Transmit
    • Unix: ftp command
  • AppleTalk

    AppleTalk is a proprietary suite of network protocols developed by Apple. It was included in the original Macintosh (1984) but is now deprecated by Apple in favor of TCP/IP.